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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 4  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 210-212

Correlation of preoperatively predicted and intraoperative soft-tissue releases in total knee arthroplasty


1 Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, College of Medicine, Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Dammam, Saudi Arabia
2 Department of Surgery, Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Hamilton Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada
3 Department of Surgery, Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, London Health Sciences Centre University Campus, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Mohammad M Alzahrani
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, College of Medicine, Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, 2835 King Faisal Road, Dammam 34212
Saudi Arabia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jmsr.jmsr_69_20

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Objectives: Soft-tissue balancing is one of the key components to achieving a successful total knee arthroplasty (TKA), but the planned soft-tissue release may not always correlate with the required releases intraoperatively to achieve a balanced knee. The aim of our study is to explore whether these required releases can be predicted accurately preoperatively and if their accuracy correlates with the level of training. Methods: Two hundred and fifty-one patients undergoing primary TKA were included in the study. Preoperatively, the consultant, fellow, and resident independently predicted the required releases to gain a balanced knee. Postoperatively, the performed releases were recorded and compared to the preoperative predictions. Results: Consultants had the highest exact match (62%), while the fellows and residents were less accurate (57% and 58%, respectively). Fellows and consultants had the least deviation of their prediction from the performed soft-tissue release. The intraclass correlation coefficients were also highest for consultants, followed by fellows and then residents, but this was not statistically significant. Conclusion: We found that participants irrespective of their level of training were able to accurately predict the required soft-tissue balancing in TKA. We believe this can be a valuable educational and assessment tool for trainees at all levels.


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